Educate Them App

6 Campaigns Created|London, UK, United Kingdom (UK)
13.04%
£6,520.00 raised of £50,000.00 goal
Minimum amount is £49000 Maximum amount is £45000
£

Overview

Educate The Disabled Child
UCUK promotes social inclusion and development of those most excluded from society, in particular members of the Ugandan/African Diaspora by organising workshops in literacy and CV writing; by mentoring people in education and employment; and by providing counselling, advice, information and general support.

 

Educate Them App was established with the conviction that putting education of the disabled children first on the public agenda as a fundamental for the realisation of their rights and wellbeing and for bringing about lasting social and economic progress in Africa.

 

UCUK’s work is rights based, inspired by universal values and informed by global experiences and knowledge. Its work is guided by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and other relevant regional and international human rights instruments. UCUK aims to specifically contribute to the well-being of the girl’s child giving priority to those with disability by providing a platform for dialogue; collaborate with governments, inter-governmental organisations and civil society in the development and implementation of effective pro-child policies and programmes and also promote a common voice for children in and out of Africa and giving school fees and support to keep them to the education system.

 

The world is becoming less tolerant of exclusionary and discriminatory practices, including discrimination against persons with disabilities, due to increasing knowledge as well as growing awareness of universal human rights. Increased global accountability and commitment to the rights of persons with disabilities was made manifest by the adoption in 2006 by the UN of a Convention and Optional Protocol on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). The UNCRPD is a comprehensive instrument which provides all necessary guidance for national law and policy to ensure non-discrimination, equality of opportunity, full participation and social inclusion of persons with disabilities in all countries.

 

Where attitudes and public discourse are positive and empowering, where services are available to all regardless of disability, and where persons with disabilities are participating actively in the life of their communities, then ALL will experience the benefits of inclusion.

The e-learning App will help users to access a database of unlimited educational materials.

The App will be free to use social learning platform from South Africa, that helps connect everyone in the learning space. Students can make a profile and connect with people from around the world, get news from schools, and submit school works. It works very much like a social media with a heavier focus on education.

Children with disabilities especially girls child suffer an even more severe impact of the discrimination and attitudinal challenges generally faced by people with disabilities. As children, they are powerless, reflecting their limited access to economic resources, their exclusion from political participation, and the corresponding cultural image of childhood as a state of weakness, dependency and incompetence.

According to UNESCO, disability is one of the least visible but most potent factors in educational marginalisation. This is despite the fact that educational access, and subsequent success in education, is the gateway to change in many other areas of life for individuals with disabilities particularly the girl child. Nothing will change society’s attitudes to disability more than educational access. The way educational laws and policies are formulated and implemented determine the success or failure of the school system, and eventually of the children with disabilities learning within it; this means that these law and policy instruments have to be reviewed regularly and updated with new trends, knowledge and skills, lest they become obsolete and irresponsible.

A preliminary investigation, carried out by The African Child Policy Forum, revealed that most African countries lack a proper law and policy strategy for the schooling of children with disabilities that complies with the requirements recognised in International and Regional Human Rights Instruments, and which is in keeping with current trends and perspectives on the education of children with disabilities.

Cause and extent of educational exclusion of children with disabilities

Disability has been a major cause of educational exclusion. Children with disabilities are far less likely to go to school or to stay in school, for a variety of reasons including poverty, inaccessible school and public transport facilities, and public prejudice.

In many instances, regular classes may contain up to 100 children and are staffed by teachers who have only just left school themselves. In such circumstances, it is not surprising that some schools are unwilling to include children with disabilities, or that some parents prefer to keep their children at home, working in the fields or looking after younger siblings. According to UNESCO, fewer than 10 per cent of children with disabilities in Africa receive primary education. Various official estimates even suggest that perhaps only one child with disability out of a hundred attends any form of schooling in most African and Asian countries. Schools admitting children with disabilities normally only exist in towns and cities, often organised by parent groups or voluntary organisations, and with access restricted to those that can pay.

Children with disabilities aged 0-6 years are the least catered for educationally. Pre-school children with disabilities are not a common feature in sub-Saharan Africa. Most pre­schools found in the region form a section of an existing special primary school. This is partly due to the lack of assessment and screening services and expertise.

Lack of educational facilities is not the only reason for the limited access to education of

 children with disabilities. Household deprivation and negative parental and community attitudes – which can go as far as causing parents to hide children from public view, or to think they are uneducable – play an equally important role in limiting access.

In Kenya, for instance, community-based projects include fieldwork designed to:

  1. Identify children with disabilities, and work with parents, siblings and relatives, training them to train their children in turn, using individualised programmes (mainly the Portage or other materials developed by the field workers themselves).
  2. Organise playgroups for early stimulation and pre-school activities.
  3. Organise meetings and workshops for parents.

The field workers, selected from the community, are trained on the job. The projects are run by management committees, but rely on external funding.

  • 20-07-2020

    July Update Example

    Overview

    Educate The Disabled Child
    UCUK promotes social inclusion and development of those most excluded from society, in particular members of the Ugandan/African Diaspora by organising workshops in literacy and CV writing; by mentoring people in education and employment; and by providing counselling, advice, information and general support.

     

    Educate Them App was established with the conviction that putting education of the disabled children first on the public agenda as a fundamental for the realisation of their rights and wellbeing and for bringing about lasting social and economic progress in Africa.

     

    UCUK’s work is rights based, inspired by universal values and informed by global experiences and knowledge. Its work is guided by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and other relevant regional and international human rights instruments. UCUK aims to specifically contribute to the well-being of the girl’s child giving priority to those with disability by providing a platform for dialogue; collaborate with governments, inter-governmental organisations and civil society in the development and implementation of effective pro-child policies and programmes and also promote a common voice for children in and out of Africa and giving school fees and support to keep them to the education system.

     

    The world is becoming less tolerant of exclusionary and discriminatory practices, including discrimination against persons with disabilities, due to increasing knowledge as well as growing awareness of universal human rights. Increased global accountability and commitment to the rights of persons with disabilities was made manifest by the adoption in 2006 by the UN of a Convention and Optional Protocol on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). The UNCRPD is a comprehensive instrument which provides all necessary guidance for national law and policy to ensure non-discrimination, equality of opportunity, full participation and social inclusion of persons with disabilities in all countries.

     

    Where attitudes and public discourse are positive and empowering, where services are available to all regardless of disability, and where persons with disabilities are participating actively in the life of their communities, then ALL will experience the benefits of inclusion.


    The e-learning App will help users to access a database of unlimited educational materials.

    The App will be free to use social learning platform from South Africa, that helps connect everyone in the learning space. Students can make a profile and connect with people from around the world, get news from schools, and submit school works. It works very much like a social media with a heavier focus on education.

    Children with disabilities especially girls child suffer an even more severe impact of the discrimination and attitudinal challenges generally faced by people with disabilities. As children, they are powerless, reflecting their limited access to economic resources, their exclusion from political participation, and the corresponding cultural image of childhood as a state of weakness, dependency and incompetence.

    According to UNESCO, disability is one of the least visible but most potent factors in educational marginalisation. This is despite the fact that educational access, and subsequent success in education, is the gateway to change in many other areas of life for individuals with disabilities particularly the girl child. Nothing will change society’s attitudes to disability more than educational access. The way educational laws and policies are formulated and implemented determine the success or failure of the school system, and eventually of the children with disabilities learning within it; this means that these law and policy instruments have to be reviewed regularly and updated with new trends, knowledge and skills, lest they become obsolete and irresponsible.

    A preliminary investigation, carried out by The African Child Policy Forum, revealed that most African countries lack a proper law and policy strategy for the schooling of children with disabilities that complies with the requirements recognised in International and Regional Human Rights Instruments, and which is in keeping with current trends and perspectives on the education of children with disabilities.

    Cause and extent of educational exclusion of children with disabilities

    Disability has been a major cause of educational exclusion. Children with disabilities are far less likely to go to school or to stay in school, for a variety of reasons including poverty, inaccessible school and public transport facilities, and public prejudice.

    In many instances, regular classes may contain up to 100 children and are staffed by teachers who have only just left school themselves. In such circumstances, it is not surprising that some schools are unwilling to include children with disabilities, or that some parents prefer to keep their children at home, working in the fields or looking after younger siblings. According to UNESCO, fewer than 10 per cent of children with disabilities in Africa receive primary education. Various official estimates even suggest that perhaps only one child with disability out of a hundred attends any form of schooling in most African and Asian countries. Schools admitting children with disabilities normally only exist in towns and cities, often organised by parent groups or voluntary organisations, and with access restricted to those that can pay.

    Children with disabilities aged 0-6 years are the least catered for educationally. Pre-school children with disabilities are not a common feature in sub-Saharan Africa. Most pre­schools found in the region form a section of an existing special primary school. This is partly due to the lack of assessment and screening services and expertise.

    Lack of educational facilities is not the only reason for the limited access to education of

     children with disabilities. Household deprivation and negative parental and community attitudes – which can go as far as causing parents to hide children from public view, or to think they are uneducable – play an equally important role in limiting access.

    In Kenya, for instance, community-based projects include fieldwork designed to:

    1. Identify children with disabilities, and work with parents, siblings and relatives, training them to train their children in turn, using individualised programmes (mainly the Portage or other materials developed by the field workers themselves).
    2. Organise playgroups for early stimulation and pre-school activities.
    3. Organise meetings and workshops for parents.

    The field workers, selected from the community, are trained on the job. The projects are run by management committees, but rely on external funding.

  • 25-08-2020

    August Update Example

    Overview

    Educate The Disabled Child
    UCUK promotes social inclusion and development of those most excluded from society, in particular members of the Ugandan/African Diaspora by organising workshops in literacy and CV writing; by mentoring people in education and employment; and by providing counselling, advice, information and general support.

     

    Educate Them App was established with the conviction that putting education of the disabled children first on the public agenda as a fundamental for the realisation of their rights and wellbeing and for bringing about lasting social and economic progress in Africa.

     

    UCUK’s work is rights based, inspired by universal values and informed by global experiences and knowledge. Its work is guided by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and other relevant regional and international human rights instruments. UCUK aims to specifically contribute to the well-being of the girl’s child giving priority to those with disability by providing a platform for dialogue; collaborate with governments, inter-governmental organisations and civil society in the development and implementation of effective pro-child policies and programmes and also promote a common voice for children in and out of Africa and giving school fees and support to keep them to the education system.

     

    The world is becoming less tolerant of exclusionary and discriminatory practices, including discrimination against persons with disabilities, due to increasing knowledge as well as growing awareness of universal human rights. Increased global accountability and commitment to the rights of persons with disabilities was made manifest by the adoption in 2006 by the UN of a Convention and Optional Protocol on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). The UNCRPD is a comprehensive instrument which provides all necessary guidance for national law and policy to ensure non-discrimination, equality of opportunity, full participation and social inclusion of persons with disabilities in all countries.

     

    Where attitudes and public discourse are positive and empowering, where services are available to all regardless of disability, and where persons with disabilities are participating actively in the life of their communities, then ALL will experience the benefits of inclusion.


    The e-learning App will help users to access a database of unlimited educational materials.

    The App will be free to use social learning platform from South Africa, that helps connect everyone in the learning space. Students can make a profile and connect with people from around the world, get news from schools, and submit school works. It works very much like a social media with a heavier focus on education.

    Children with disabilities especially girls child suffer an even more severe impact of the discrimination and attitudinal challenges generally faced by people with disabilities. As children, they are powerless, reflecting their limited access to economic resources, their exclusion from political participation, and the corresponding cultural image of childhood as a state of weakness, dependency and incompetence.

    According to UNESCO, disability is one of the least visible but most potent factors in educational marginalisation. This is despite the fact that educational access, and subsequent success in education, is the gateway to change in many other areas of life for individuals with disabilities particularly the girl child. Nothing will change society’s attitudes to disability more than educational access. The way educational laws and policies are formulated and implemented determine the success or failure of the school system, and eventually of the children with disabilities learning within it; this means that these law and policy instruments have to be reviewed regularly and updated with new trends, knowledge and skills, lest they become obsolete and irresponsible.

    A preliminary investigation, carried out by The African Child Policy Forum, revealed that most African countries lack a proper law and policy strategy for the schooling of children with disabilities that complies with the requirements recognised in International and Regional Human Rights Instruments, and which is in keeping with current trends and perspectives on the education of children with disabilities.

    Cause and extent of educational exclusion of children with disabilities

    Disability has been a major cause of educational exclusion. Children with disabilities are far less likely to go to school or to stay in school, for a variety of reasons including poverty, inaccessible school and public transport facilities, and public prejudice.

    In many instances, regular classes may contain up to 100 children and are staffed by teachers who have only just left school themselves. In such circumstances, it is not surprising that some schools are unwilling to include children with disabilities, or that some parents prefer to keep their children at home, working in the fields or looking after younger siblings. According to UNESCO, fewer than 10 per cent of children with disabilities in Africa receive primary education. Various official estimates even suggest that perhaps only one child with disability out of a hundred attends any form of schooling in most African and Asian countries. Schools admitting children with disabilities normally only exist in towns and cities, often organised by parent groups or voluntary organisations, and with access restricted to those that can pay.

    Children with disabilities aged 0-6 years are the least catered for educationally. Pre-school children with disabilities are not a common feature in sub-Saharan Africa. Most pre­schools found in the region form a section of an existing special primary school. This is partly due to the lack of assessment and screening services and expertise.

    Lack of educational facilities is not the only reason for the limited access to education of

     children with disabilities. Household deprivation and negative parental and community attitudes – which can go as far as causing parents to hide children from public view, or to think they are uneducable – play an equally important role in limiting access.

    In Kenya, for instance, community-based projects include fieldwork designed to:

    1. Identify children with disabilities, and work with parents, siblings and relatives, training them to train their children in turn, using individualised programmes (mainly the Portage or other materials developed by the field workers themselves).
    2. Organise playgroups for early stimulation and pre-school activities.
    3. Organise meetings and workshops for parents.

    The field workers, selected from the community, are trained on the job. The projects are run by management committees, but rely on external funding.

  • 01-01-2021

    New Year Update Example

    Overview

    Educate The Disabled Child
    UCUK promotes social inclusion and development of those most excluded from society, in particular members of the Ugandan/African Diaspora by organising workshops in literacy and CV writing; by mentoring people in education and employment; and by providing counselling, advice, information and general support.

     

    Educate Them App was established with the conviction that putting education of the disabled children first on the public agenda as a fundamental for the realisation of their rights and wellbeing and for bringing about lasting social and economic progress in Africa.

     

    UCUK’s work is rights based, inspired by universal values and informed by global experiences and knowledge. Its work is guided by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and other relevant regional and international human rights instruments. UCUK aims to specifically contribute to the well-being of the girl’s child giving priority to those with disability by providing a platform for dialogue; collaborate with governments, inter-governmental organisations and civil society in the development and implementation of effective pro-child policies and programmes and also promote a common voice for children in and out of Africa and giving school fees and support to keep them to the education system.

     

    The world is becoming less tolerant of exclusionary and discriminatory practices, including discrimination against persons with disabilities, due to increasing knowledge as well as growing awareness of universal human rights. Increased global accountability and commitment to the rights of persons with disabilities was made manifest by the adoption in 2006 by the UN of a Convention and Optional Protocol on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). The UNCRPD is a comprehensive instrument which provides all necessary guidance for national law and policy to ensure non-discrimination, equality of opportunity, full participation and social inclusion of persons with disabilities in all countries.

     

    Where attitudes and public discourse are positive and empowering, where services are available to all regardless of disability, and where persons with disabilities are participating actively in the life of their communities, then ALL will experience the benefits of inclusion.


    The e-learning App will help users to access a database of unlimited educational materials.

    The App will be free to use social learning platform from South Africa, that helps connect everyone in the learning space. Students can make a profile and connect with people from around the world, get news from schools, and submit school works. It works very much like a social media with a heavier focus on education.

    Children with disabilities especially girls child suffer an even more severe impact of the discrimination and attitudinal challenges generally faced by people with disabilities. As children, they are powerless, reflecting their limited access to economic resources, their exclusion from political participation, and the corresponding cultural image of childhood as a state of weakness, dependency and incompetence.

    According to UNESCO, disability is one of the least visible but most potent factors in educational marginalisation. This is despite the fact that educational access, and subsequent success in education, is the gateway to change in many other areas of life for individuals with disabilities particularly the girl child. Nothing will change society’s attitudes to disability more than educational access. The way educational laws and policies are formulated and implemented determine the success or failure of the school system, and eventually of the children with disabilities learning within it; this means that these law and policy instruments have to be reviewed regularly and updated with new trends, knowledge and skills, lest they become obsolete and irresponsible.

    A preliminary investigation, carried out by The African Child Policy Forum, revealed that most African countries lack a proper law and policy strategy for the schooling of children with disabilities that complies with the requirements recognised in International and Regional Human Rights Instruments, and which is in keeping with current trends and perspectives on the education of children with disabilities.

    Cause and extent of educational exclusion of children with disabilities

    Disability has been a major cause of educational exclusion. Children with disabilities are far less likely to go to school or to stay in school, for a variety of reasons including poverty, inaccessible school and public transport facilities, and public prejudice.

    In many instances, regular classes may contain up to 100 children and are staffed by teachers who have only just left school themselves. In such circumstances, it is not surprising that some schools are unwilling to include children with disabilities, or that some parents prefer to keep their children at home, working in the fields or looking after younger siblings. According to UNESCO, fewer than 10 per cent of children with disabilities in Africa receive primary education. Various official estimates even suggest that perhaps only one child with disability out of a hundred attends any form of schooling in most African and Asian countries. Schools admitting children with disabilities normally only exist in towns and cities, often organised by parent groups or voluntary organisations, and with access restricted to those that can pay.

    Children with disabilities aged 0-6 years are the least catered for educationally. Pre-school children with disabilities are not a common feature in sub-Saharan Africa. Most pre­schools found in the region form a section of an existing special primary school. This is partly due to the lack of assessment and screening services and expertise.

    Lack of educational facilities is not the only reason for the limited access to education of

     children with disabilities. Household deprivation and negative parental and community attitudes – which can go as far as causing parents to hide children from public view, or to think they are uneducable – play an equally important role in limiting access.

    In Kenya, for instance, community-based projects include fieldwork designed to:

    1. Identify children with disabilities, and work with parents, siblings and relatives, training them to train their children in turn, using individualised programmes (mainly the Portage or other materials developed by the field workers themselves).
    2. Organise playgroups for early stimulation and pre-school activities.
    3. Organise meetings and workshops for parents.

    The field workers, selected from the community, are trained on the job. The projects are run by management committees, but rely on external funding.